A Book Publicist’s Take on Negative Book Reviews

By Stacey J. Miller, Book Publicist
S. J. Miller Communications
bookpromotion@gmail.com

Book publicists who snare book reviews for authors always want to give novelists and experts what they want: positive, affirmative book reviews. We want authors to feel good about their books, and all book publicists have worked with authors whose egos have been shattered by criticism of their writing. It’s particularly hard for book publicists to read negative book reviews since, as book publicists, we take on only projects in which we strongly believe. That means a negative book review doesn’t only reflect poorly on the author. It also is a statement about a book publicist’s judgment, and a book publicist’s reputation is only as good as the last book he or she promoted…so negative book reviews affect a book publicist’s bottom line, too.

Don’t Frustrate This Book Publicist or Yourself!

By Stacey J. Miller, Book Publicist
S. J. Miller Communications
bookpromotion@gmail.com

Don’t frustrate this book publicist or yourself! If you’re seeking traditional book reviews for your novel, then approach book publicists between four and six months before your book’s publication date.

A new novelist just approached this frustrated book publicist to let her know about her upcoming novel. It will be published at the end of July, the author told me with great excitement. And could I work with her to get magazines and newspapers to review her book?

How to Maximize a Book Promotion Opportunity

By Stacey J. Miller, Book Publicist
S. J. Miller Communications
bookpromotion@gmail.com

Four Ways to Deal With Confrontational Interviewers

A few authors seek publicity in any way they can grab it. Recently, a highly successful comedian stormed off the set during a nationally-televised interview during her book promotion campaign.

The story went viral, and it deserved to, because it was so unusual. Most authors appreciate interview opportunities, and they don’t try to create drama during those interviews. In fact, when they come across hosts whose style is confrontational, most authors see that as their worst nightmare. They hope to make it through their entire book publicity campaign without ever encountering conflict during an interview. Yet, because there’s a built-in audience for highly dramatic interviews, it’s likely that, sooner or later, every author will run into an interviewer whose style is confrontational.

How to Blow a Book Promotion Opportunity

By Stacey J. Miller, Book Publicist
S. J. Miller Communications
bookpromotion@gmail.com

Would you like to see a great example of how to blow a book promotion opportunity? I give you Joan Rivers who walked out on an interview with CNN’s Fredricka Whitfield while promoting her latest book. What was Joan River’s new title, again? It seems to have flown clear out of this book publicist’s head. Sorry about that, Joan Rivers.

And you know what? If Joan’s arrogance and belligerence were a book publicity stunt, then — because I don’t think combative behavior is ever defensible or attactive — I hope it fails, miserably, in the book sales department.

E-book Novelist Claire Davon on the Art of Writing

Writing isn’t as easy as eBook novelist, Claire Davon, makes it look. Here’s what Claire has to say about her writing habits. (Note that Claire’s e-Books will have special pricing on Amazon for the next few days as part of her book promotion and book marketing campaign. Click here to find out more.)

By Claire Davon

Art is hard to consistently write for this romance and action/adventure novelist!

Tony Horwitz’s Book Publicity Tale of Woe

By Stacey J. Miller, Book Publicist
S. J. Miller Communications
bookpromotion@gmail.com

Author Tony Horwitz is disgruntled with the world of ebook publishing and his prospects of earning a living wage as a full-time author. With a small advance, he relied on his ebook publisher’s book promotion machine…and, when that book promotion machine stalled, Horwitz found himself in the unenviable position of having to make potential book buyers aware of his book himself.

Besides which, Horwitz’s publisher dropped the ball (it’s complicated), and then Amazon (it’s even more complicated but, this time, Hatchette doesn’t seem directly to be involved) dropped the ebook.

Bad Book Publicity?

By Stacey J. Miller, Book Publicist
S. J. Miller Communications
bookpromotion@gmail.com

They say there’s no such thing as bad publicity, and I’d interpret that to mean there’s no such thing as bad book publicity, either.

Sometimes, I would agree with that. Usually, I would say that even a lukewarm book review is better than no book review at all, or a combative interviewer is far kinder than the interviewer who chooses to ignore you completely.

But, after seeing the book publicity opportunities recently garnered by Gary L. Stewart, author of the new book, The Most Dangerous Animal of All: Searching for My Father…and Finding the Zodiac Killer, this book publicist has to wonder about that.

This is something authors should not do for book publicity!

Disowning their own books generally is not something authors do for book publicity…but the io9 10 Great Authors Who Disowned Their Own Books list should make an author who’s in the midst of a book promotion campaign stop and think. Sure, every author finds it natural to say, “My book is important, and that’s why I’m working so hard to enhance its book discovery potential.” But what happens when authors specifically ask readers to not buy their books? How does that work out for them?

Why we don’t hear more about eBook promotion.

By Stacey J. Miller, Book Publicist
S. J. Miller Communications
bookpromotion@gmail.com

Why don’t we hear more about eBook promotion? According to Futurebook, a digital blog from The Bookseller, the media still are reluctant to take eBooks seriously. And this book publicist, too, has noticed that few authors make the round of broadcast media shows as part of their book publicity campaigns. Traditional book review outlets, too, seem to be taking a wait-and-see attitude about eBooks. It’s as if traditional book reviewers are taking a wait-and-see attitude. If eBooks really catch, on then traditional book reviewers might start to take them seriously.