What’s in a Name? Potentially, Book Promotion Success.

As authors who have met me (or who have followed my book promotion blog here or at the Huffington Post) know, I’m a strong support of independent book publishing and independent authors. I think it’s empowering to write a book, publish a book, design a book, produce a book, and market a book without the restrictions that might be imposed by a traditional book publisher.

That said, there are times when a book publisher’s imprint can vastly increase a book’s promotion potential. When a major publisher gets behind a book, then that book does have the publisher’s brand behind it. And imagine this: what if you’ve written a book that would be pleasing to Massachusetts-based sports fans (the way that Rob Gronkowski is), and your publisher is Jeter Publishing?

Independent Authors: What’s Plan B if Amazon Fails?

Independent authors: what’s your Plan B if Amazon fails?

Once upon a time, it hardly mattered to authors and publishers if one book printer or book distributor or bookstore failed. There were so many others that nobody would miss it all that much.

But now we have independent authors and small publishers that rely solely on Amazon’s ecosystem (through CreateSpace and KDP) to publish, print, and distribute their books. Need a book cover for your printed book? You can use Amazon’s Cover Creator to design one. Need a cover for your ebook? You’re in luck; Amazon has a Cover Creator tool for your Kindle ebook, too. The only hitch is that, once you’ve used Cover Creator to create the cover, Amazon owns that cover. You can’t take it with you — if, for example, you wanted to bring your book to iUniverse, Lulu, or IngramSpark, or even to a traditional offset printing company.

Book publicity surprise opportunities

By Stacey J. Miller, Book Publicist
S. J. Miller Communications
bookpromotion@gmail.com

We all work hard to create book promotion opportunities. That’s why serendipitous book publicity opportunities are so welcome. How would you like to generate unexpected book publicity opportunities? An invitation to appear on a radio show that comes your way while you’re busy doing other things — such as writing books? Perfect!

How do you garner book publicity opportunities without persistent outreach to radio show producers and radio show hosts, though?
That’s easy, and you don’t even have to be a book publicist, or an especially aggressive author to do it. With a little bit of savvy self-marketing, you can get radio show opportunities even when you’re not reaching out for them.

The Trajectory of Book Publicity

By Stacey J. Miller, Book Publicist
S. J. Miller Communications
bookpromotion@gmail.com

What does book discovery mean to authors and publishers? Everything, obviously. Book discovery is the whole purpose of book publicity and brand building: when authors and their books receive media attention, build their brand, and expand their online footprints, then they can differentiate themselves from competing authors and books (and videos, blogs, and the like), and they can persuade potential readers to purchase their books. Book discovery, then, is tied into book promotion and brand building which, in turn, directly affects book sales.

A Year of Books and Mark Zuckerberg, Part 2

By Stacey J. Miller, Book Publicist
S. J. Miller Communications
bookpromotion@gmail.com

Yes, Mark Zuckerberg, famed founder of Facebook, has launched an online book club. Now, what does that mean for book sales? Take a guess. Go ahead.

Sales of the first Mark Zuckerberg selection, The End of Power, have soared. The Telegraph‘s Rhiannon Williams provides these details:

A Year of Books and Mark Zuckerberg

By Stacey J. Miller, Book Publicist
S. J. Miller Communications
bookpromotion@gmail.com

Could Mark Zuckerberg, the founder of Facebook, be the biggest thing to happen to book publicity since Oprah? If he has his way, he will.

According to CNN.com, Mark Zuckerberg has committed to starting a book club in 2015. He will read a book every two weeks, and he has invited his Facebook followers (and, presumably, the media) to join him. Mark Zuckerberg is calling 2015 “a year of books.” Amen to that!

Book Publicity Tool

By Stacey J. Miller, Book Publicist
S. J. Miller Communications
bookpromotion@gmail.com

Believe it or not, here’s a book publicity tool you once had and will probably want again for the duration of your book promotion campaign: a landline.

Yes, as a citizen of the world (besides being a book publicist), I know that just about everyone has traded in his or her landline for a cell phone. It’s the economical and reasonable way to go. Why pay for landline telephone service that you don’t need?

Book publicity via Twitter

By Stacey J. Miller, Book Publicist
S. J. Miller Communications
bookpromotion@gmail.com

Can Twitter be part of your book marketing and book publicity campaign? It can, according to what this book publicist has seen and what novelist Helen Clark has experience (see her excellent Huffington Post blog, “Making Twitter Work for Your Book“).

Twitter, like blogging, can connect authors with their target readership quickly, and can be instantly gratifying. Book marketing means making those connections, and using those connections to build your brand, and Twitter can be an important part of the platform that you use to sell your books and your expertise. In other words, yes, Twitter can be part of your book marketing and book publicity campaign.

Book publicity idea: book giveaways and book contests

By Stacey J. Miller, Book Publicist
S. J. Miller Communications
bookpromotion@gmail.com

It may seem like a counter-intuitive book publicity idea: giving books away instead of selling them to generate book buzz. But, just as book publicists (and authors and publishers who are conducting book publicity campaigns) give away books to book reviewers (and producers, editors, journalists, and bloggers) to garner book promotion opportunities, it makes sense to directly give books away to your intended readers via book giveaway or contest.

A lesson for this book publicist.

By Stacey J. Miller, Book Publicist
S. J. Miller Communications
bookpromotion@gmail.com

A radio producer sent me a positive response to an email pitch yesterday. Eager to book the radio interview for my client, I read the email from top to bottom — and, unfortunately, I noticed that the producer had prematurely hit the “send” button, so the email was truncated. I let the radio producer know, so that we could get that book publicity interview locked in, and I expected an instant reply. It took about 24 hours to hear back from him, though, and that taught this book publicist a lesson.